Abrasiveness Trap: Women are described differently than men in reviews

In the technological world, there is a high-demand for performance that is sought throughout the culture. Men and women, alike, nowadays share the same job, but are judge differently by their peers and bosses based on their gender. In the article, “The abrasiveness trap: High-achieving men and women are described differently in reviews”, written by Kieran Snyder, studies the reviews of men and women’s performance on their occupation. Snyder, in a statistical study, found no correlation in the possibility of a company’s size or “patterns to a unique company” to gender bias, but of specifically, their gender. Gender performance, as the studies show, is very transparent in relation to men and women being critically reviewed differently based on their gender.

With the 248 reviews that the author has collected, both from men and women, 87.9% of women’s reviews by their managers received critical feedback whereas men received 58.9%. There was a direct correlation on the difference in these reviews between the two genders. Women are described with words such as bossy, abrasive and strident when they are in charge, but emotional and irrational when they object. According to the author, most of these words show up at least twice in each women’s reviews whereas the only connotating word that appeared on men’s reviews were “aggressive”; even then the word only shows up three times out of the 141 reviews submitted by men.

performance-reviews-graphic1In comparison to Judith Butler’s gender performativity issues, this is a clear example of performance being based differently because of gender. Women are biasedly reviewed by their peers and bosses in their workplace because their counterpart’s perception of them are abrasive or irrational. This is an issue that needs to be tend to by our society as a whole and government to show clarity on the issues of gender performance.

 

Snyder, Kieran. “The abrasiveness trap: High-achieving men and women are described differently in  their reviews”. Fortune.com. 26 August 2014. Web. 15 July 2016.

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One thought on “Abrasiveness Trap: Women are described differently than men in reviews

  1. Interesting topic choice! This is absolutely a problem and, yes, “bossy” is one of the most common words to describe high-power women in the workplace (and it really shouldn’t be a bad thing, I think being bossy is awesome), but it is also important to acknowledge that for many positions, women are paid less than men to perform exactly the same tasks – it is not merely a matter of being reviewed differently.

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