The Modern American Prison

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(Photo by Grant Slater)

As a contemporary comparison to the Panopticon, I will be researching the Corcoran California State Prison. This facility is known for its corrupt guards, who were known to set up and bet on fights between the inmates and often shot them afterwards, with no legal justification. The prison has held multiple high-profile inmates, who live in Level IV housing (individual cells, fenced/walled perimeters, electronic security system, and a high armed guard to prisoner ratio).

The connection of this prison structure to the motives explained by Foucault of power and discipline are highly apparent when the motives of the guards are called into question, and this is what I will aim to explain through my paper.

 

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2 thoughts on “The Modern American Prison

  1. The topic you chose was great. I think adding the Prison Industrial Complex and School-to-prison pipeline would make your argument stronger. The United States prison industry is very deep rooted in American culture, to the extent where the 13th amendment allows enslavement and the eradication of suffrage if convicted of a crime. I love the topic and keep the good work up

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  2. I think your topic is a very interesting and controversial topic! I personally, haven’t heard of this issue happening in this specific prison, but it sounds quite similar to the Guantanamo Bay incidents. A high-profile prison known for its inhumane treatment of its “residents”, is regarded likely as one of the most mysterious area to the public eye. The government keeps the prison on lock without anyone get an in-depth look into what is going on there, but speculations are these detainees are accused high-risk terrorists that are being tortured for information. There is no clear justification to this controversial occurrence of people being placed in there; moreover it is similar to Panopticon, in the sense that these detainees are mostly being watched 24/7.

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